Tuesday, June 2, 2020

Looking Out My Back Door


Stanley Park
One of the unexpected benefits of the Covid lock-down is having the chance to really get acquainted with your own backyard. In my case, living on the edge of English Bay, I'm particularly fortunate as I can go for my morning swim in the ocean and then later go for a hike in my backyard, otherwise known as Stanley Park. The jewel of Vancouver, this 1,000 acre peninsula bordering the downtown and surrounded by the waters of English Bay and Burrard Inlet, is home to an amazingly diverse collection of attractions offering something for everyone.


In spite of countless walks along the seawall, visits to the Aquarium, attending concerts & plays at Malkin Bowl, dining at the various restaurants, watching cricket and rugby games at Brockton Oval, riding the miniature train, going on photo expeditions in Lost Lagoon and Beaver Lake, playing tennis and golf, swimming at 2nd Beach Pool, and being a member of the Vancouver Rowing Club, I had never seriously explored the more than 27 km of beautifully groomed trails running through the Park but now I had the perfect opportunity.



The original skid roads for the selective logging that took place in the Park in the 1860's-1880's later formed the basis of the trail system in use today. While the Park is still densely forested with a mixture of Douglas fir, hemlock, and cedar trees, there is plenty of evidence of trees that were cut down with the old hand logging methods using springboards that were notched into what is now the stump of the tree. The ghosts of these mighty trees can be found throughout the Park.






The Park supports a wide range of creatures including elusive coyotes and beavers, fearsome squirrels, and mysterious lions. Canada geese that don't seem to fly north or south, various species of ducks, owls and bald eagles, and one of the largest colonies of blue herons in North America are some of the birds that also make the Park their home. There's even room for horses. And, like parks everywhere, it also provides shelter for various homeless individuals.

Beaver lodge in Beaver Lake
Fearsome Gray Squirrel - photo by Junie Quiroga



Mysterious Stanley Park Lion


Blue Heron - photo by Junie Quiroga


Homeless Crib
From the beautifully appointed rose garden, to water lilies and other plants around Beaver Lake, and the rhododendron garden on the edge of Lost Lagoon, it's the flowers that make it for some while, for others, its just the cool shaded ferns and trees in the forest.









When the City of Vancouver was incorporated in 1886 the first order of business was to secure the park from the dominion government (who had been using it as a military reserve) and in 1888 it was officially named Stanley Park after Lord Stanley, the country's governor general, who also donated the Stanley Cup that was later given to the NHL. In 1938 the Lions Gate Bridge, a suspension bridge connecting Vancouver to the North Shore through the middle of Stanley Park, was opened and included a pair of cast concrete lions in reference to the pair of north shore mountain peaks known as The Lions. A trail to the start of the bridge enables one to get up close and personal with the lions, get their autograph, and even go underneath the bridge itself to get to the other side.


Nelson and The Lions
Lions Gate Lion


The trails not only offer good exercise and a cardio workout as you climb in elevation from Lost Lagoon to Prospect Point they also provide stunning views of the ocean and other natural attractions like Siwash Rock. According to various coastal first nations legends a man was transformed into the rock either as punishment for some evil deed or as a reward for unselfishness. 





Of course after all that exercise the first thing that comes to mind is a nice cold beer and something to eat. While the pubs and restaurants in the City are all closed at least the newly opened Stanley Park Brewpub is offering takeout which can then be discreetly consumed on a nearby bench.



Mark & Nelson
And even if the swimming pools are closed, the ocean is always open and all you need is a wetsuit to be able to enjoy a pleasant morning swim in English Bay. Stanley Park has allowed me to keep fit and stay active no matter what is going on in the world and, thanks to this temporary health crisis, I've had the opportunity to appreciate and explore things I've never seen before. All I had to do was take a look out my own back door.

Ian, Peter & Nelson




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